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Is Your Shirt Worth What You Are Paying? Pattern Matching Is A Great Way To Tell

October 21, 2009

Signature Antonio Valente: matching sleeve plackets, pockets, and shirt fronts

Taking the time to produce signature Antonio Valente matching sleeve plackets, pockets, and shirt fronts

The most obvious sign of a well made shirt, after fabric quality, is matching. By properly aligning pieces within a marker, the layout of individual pieces needed to make a shirt, each component should seamlessly flow into the next, once assembled.

Depending on the quality of a shirt, it may have varying degrees of matching. At Antonio Valente we take great pride in the overall appearance of our shirts, which all have matching from one front to the other, from the pocket to the front, from the sleeve placket to the sleeve, and the collar, cuffs and front are all made using the same centre line. In the case of our Sartorial collection, we also match the yoke to the sleeves.

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right: the matching dress shirt and casual shirt sleeve

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right: the matching dress shirt and casual shirt sleeve

Many labels or manufacturers avoid matching much of their shirts, especially those with big or interesting patterns. They avoid taking the time to do it because it requires more fabric and more time – both of which cut into margins. For example, if I were to take a paisley pattern and make two equally sized and styled shirts, one without matching and the other with everything matched, the fabric usage would be drastically different. In fact, the shirt without matching would only need about 1 yard 31 inches whereas the latter would require about 2 yards 10 inches! Additionally, the amount of time to handle and sew a fully matched shirt is much more intensive than its mid to low-end counter parts.

When shopping for shirts, pay attention to the matching and I’m willing to wager that you’ll be shocked at what you will find…or won’t find.

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